“We feel at home” at the Calthorpe: Community garden volunteers share their experiences

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Screening short films made by participants in various community-gardens in London stimulated a discussion about volunteers’ experiences, especially getting to know different kinds of people, sharing their skills, feeling more healthy, and spreading cultivation more widely. These benefits had special importance during the Covid-19 pandemic when many people otherwise faced social isolation.

Community food growing helps build the future differently: An invitation to tell your visual story

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Starting in September 2021, we are recruiting a second cohort of participants for a collaborative digital-storytelling project organised in partnership with The Open University, Sustain and RISC. The autumn 2021 course will focus on how community food growing has built community resilience, as a potential means to bypass and contest the dominant agro-industrial model of food production.

Digital Storytelling about group food growing – Invitation to Participate

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Have you experienced benefits in your everyday life through group food-growing activities? Are you involved in community food growing and would like to share your story? Can you help us investigate how community food growing has helped people and groups to cope with the Covid-19 crisis?

Mental health project kicks off in Guyana

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In collaboration with Guyanese communities and stakeholders, and funded by the British Academy, the Cobra Collective is participating in ARCLIGHT (‘Action Research Community Led Initiative Guyana Health Team’), an ambitious new research project which will develop, implement and evaluate a capacity building and intervention programme for addressing the challenges of mental health in Guyana. Guyana is consistently ranked within the top five countries in the world with the highest suicide rates.

Pantani Book – 33 Amerindian Tales from the North Rupununi, Guyana

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Pantani – pronounced ‘pan-duh-nee’ — means “stories” in Makushi, the language of the Indigenous peoples of the North Rupununi, Guyana. It is also the chosen name for a digital storytelling project, which took place between June 2014 and May 2015 with the help of local storytellers Lakeram Haynes, Grace Albert, Abigail Allicock, Kenneth Butler and Janissa Roberts. All stories were originally published online, on a blog called www.pantaniblog.org. This book proposes a selection of the best ones.

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